Regarding Rumor on Sugar Suite Application

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GHNNC has looked into the possible application for a license and found that some of the rumors as to this license may be erroneous. We do not feel at this point that there is appreciative concern for this information. This potential information was placed on the PLUM Agenda for Monday April 20 for right to discuss if it was found necessary after brought to the Safety Committee earlier in the week.

Be assured GHNNC always looks out for our stakeholders and total community.

Half the People in LA to Ditch their Cars? It’ll Happen, Insists Mayor

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Mayor Eric Garcetti released a long-range plan multibillion dollar plan, including bikesharing and solar panels, to get Los Angeles green.

Mayor Eric Garcetti released a long-range plan today that lays out his goals for making the city more economically and environmentally sustainable, including adding electric car charging outlets and bikeshare stations around the city and installing more solar panels on local rooftops and lots.

Garcetti, who discussed the 20-year sustainability plan at Echo Park Lake this morning, wants the city to set goals — most of them to be achieved over the next 10 and 20 years — in dozens of areas, such as cutting water and electricity usage, making buildings more energy efficient and reducing dependence on cars for transportation.

He is calling for reducing per capita water use 22.5 percent by 2025 and 25 percent by 2035, and aiming to cut greenhouse gas emissions 45 percent by 2025, 60 percent by 2035 and 80 percent by 2050.

Garcetti wants to raise the amount of local solar power produced to 900 to 1,500 megawatts by 2025, and 1,500 to 1,800 megawatts by 2035. Among the ideas in the plan for increasing local solar energy is to put at least 1 megawatt of solar energy capacity atop the Los Angeles Convention Center by 2017. Read more »

Los Angeles Will Finally Fix its Sidewalks!

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For the first time in the history of Los Angeles, the City has made a commitment this week to establishing a sustainable, fair, long-term sidewalk repair policy by settling the Willits class action lawsuit. The City will invest $31 million per year for the next 30 years to fix our broken sidewalks!

“As chairman of the Public Works committee, I have been committed to finding solutions to fixing our streets and sidewalks since my first day on the Los Angeles City Council. The settlement of this lawsuit is a win for not only the mobility impaired, but for all Angelenos as it finally requires the city to fix its broken sidewalks. There are no losers here. I look forward to hearing from the public as we develop the details in the Public Works Committee on how residents can submit repair requests, which locations to prioritize and how quickly we can start the work,” said Councilman Joe Buscaino.

The basic terms of the settlement are as follows:

  • 30 year agreement
  • $31 million per year (in today’s dollars)
  • 15% cost escalator every 5 years to keep up with inflation
  • Will increase to $67 million per year in the final 5 years
  • Total: just over $1.3 billion
  • $5 million per year will be dedicated to curb ramps, and $26 million will be dedicated to sidewalks
  • 20% will go toward addressing specific requests made by disabled persons

Locations will be prioritized as follows:

  1. City offices and facilities (parks, rec centers, libraries, police stations, etc)
  2. Transportation corridors
  3. Hospitals, medical facilities, assisted living facilities and similar
  4. Places of public accommodation such as commercial and business zones
  5. Facilities containing employers
  6. Residential Neighborhoods

FAQ

  1. How can residents report broken sidewalks?

Call 311 or use the MyLA311 app

  1. How soon will my sidewalk be fixed?

The settlement requires repairs next to city-owned facilities first. It will take at least 2 years before that work is complete and we can move on to repairs of sidewalks adjacent to private property

  1. How can I see where my request is on the list?

There is no list of individual locations, only general direction on what types of locations get priority over what. The Budget & Finance and Public Works Committees will hold hearings in the coming months to solicit public input and develop a fair and transparent policy about priority of specific requests, as well as all of the other policy details like:

  • whether the city will pay for sidewalk repair after the 30 years or return the responsibility to the adjacent property owner
  • whether city workers or contract workers will do the work
  • whether alternative materials like porous pavement and rubber sidewalks will be allowed
  • whether the city will pay for 100 % of the repair costs, or implement a cost sharing program like 50/50.

After 40 years with no repair policy, we’re not going to get one in place overnight. But this week’s action commits the City to solving this problem.

Have you been in O’Melveny Park lately?

One of the things that helps makes our areas special is O’Melveny Park. At 672 acres it’s second in size in the city park system only to Griffith Park. It may not have some of the things Griffith Park has, like a golf course, zoo, or merry-go-round, but that’s actually a good thing. O’Melveny is a wonderful splash of undeveloped landscape nestled up next to the busy streets of the city.

If you haven’t been through the park lately it’s time to head back for a visit, especially while the hills are still green from the rain of past months. There are some great splashes of color from a wide variety of wildflowers, especially if you take the time – and effort – to hike past the meadow at the base of the park. Please enjoy the flowers and feel free to take as many pictures as you like, but don’t take the actual flowers themselves. There may be a lot of them up there, but if everyone took just one flower home the hills would soon look pretty barren. Not only that, picking flowers on city property is prohibited by law, and there are some nasty penalties if you get caught!

The city has recently installed new water fountains in the lower section of the park, and they even have a special section for thirsty dogs. Thanks to the Patriot Oil Community Benefit Trust for funding the project. Please remember that the city leash laws do apply in all sections of O’Melveny Park. It may be tempting to let your four-legged friend loose for a romp, but please keep the safety of other visitors in mind and keep your dog safely on a leash.

Speaking of safety, as things warm up you run a chance of coming across a rattlesnake basking in the sun. Keep alert and watch for them, and if you spot one, keep a safe distance. The snakes are another good reason to keep your dog close to you, and away from any snake that might be out there. Don’t let the snakes scare you off, though. They’re up there but they would prefer to stay far away from you as well.

A final word of caution. Don’t leave any valuables in sight in your car before you head into the park. The video cameras watching the parking lot have greatly reduced the problem of thefts from the cars in the lot, but don’t make it easy for anyone who might be interested in your items.

If you spot anything in the park that needs repair, or have any questions about the park facilities, you can reach the Parks & Recreation Dept. at (818) 363-3556.

We hope to see you up in the park soon!!

City Uses App to Alert People Trained in CPR of Nearby Emergencies They Can Help With

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LA partners with PulsePoint to empower residents to help save lives.

Mayor Eric Garcetti and the fire chief unveiled a smartphone app Wednesday that alerts people with CPR training if someone in a nearby public area is suffering from cardiac arrest and needs their help.

The PulsePoint app sends alerts to its users at the same time fire department dispatchers are notifying emergency crews; guides users through the CPR steps; and also shows the location of nearby defibrillators.

The alerts are only sent out for cardiac arrest victims who happen to be in a public area. Health privacy and safety concerns prevent alerts to be sent out on people suffering heart attacks at private residences.

The app also displays data about ongoing and recent emergency calls handled by the Los Angeles Fire Department, which gets about 1,200 calls daily, about 85 percent of them for medical emergencies.

The mayor announced the app with Fire Chief Ralph Terrazas at Woodrow Wilson High School in El Sereno, where 120 students have been trained in CPR.

“This app connects trained lifesavers who may already be on scene with people who need immediate help, when seconds count the most,” Garcetti said.

Terrazas said the department worked out a contract with the appmaker, PulsePoint, that “allows the LAFD to help save lives with our smartphones, which is technology that most of us already have in hand.”

“I am excited that Angelenos have another crucial tool at their fingertips that can help them further engage with their communities and fire department,” he said.

Anyone trained in CPR, whether they are off-duty public safety responders or an average citizen, can download and use the app, which is available for iPhones and Android devices.

The app is also in use in areas covered by the Los Angeles County Fire Department, which integrated the app last summer.

The creator of PulsePoint, Richard Price, is a former Bay Area fire chief who was on break eating at a restaurant when a person in the next building had a heart attack. Price was not monitoring the dispatch system and did not learn about it until the fire trucks pulled up.

Granada Hills Charter High Sets Academic Decathlon Record

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For the fourth time in five years, Granada Hills Charter High School has won the Los Angeles Unified School District Academic Decathlon.

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Granada Hills Charter High School scored a competition- record 59,167.1 points out of a possible 65,400 to win the Los Angeles Unified School District Academic Decathlon for the fourth time in five years, district officials announced tonight.

Ten other teams qualified as wild card entrants for the California Academic Decathlon, which will be held March 20-21 in Sacramento: defending national champion El Camino Real (58,223); defending district champion Marshall (56,458.6); Franklin (55,166.5); Garfield (50,790.6); Bell (49,744.8); Hamilton (48,943.8); North Hollywood (46,232.2); Van Nuys (46,058.7); Grant (45,459.3); and Harbor Teacher Prep (43,178.2).

Irene Lee from Granada Hills was the top individual scorer with 9,461.4 points, tying the record among all competitions.

Kim Monson of Narbonne won the Coach of the Year award.

The Academic Decathlon began Jan. 31 at the Roybal Learning Center near downtown Los Angeles, with teams from 59 high schools competing in the speech, interview and essay categories.

The competition concluded Saturday with tests in art, economics, language and literature, mathematics, music and social science and the Super Quiz, also at the Roybal Learning Center.

The study topic was alternatives in energy.

The results were announced at an awards ceremony at Hollywood High School.

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